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Health & Information
Food & Substances that can be harmful to dogs. Chocolate Coffee & Tea Caffeine Grapes & Raisins Currents Macadamia Nuts Milk & Dairy Products Mushrooms Onion & Garlic Raw Eggs Raw Meat Salt Yeast Dough Xylitol (Artificial Sweeter)
Bloat in GSD can cause painful death (Also known as gastric dilatation - volvulus GDV) Bloat is twisting of the stomach. (gastric torsion) Bloat requires immediate veterinary care. Bloat in the German Shepherd is a true emergency condition. Most often surgery is the only way to handle the condition once it happens. Don’t exercise your dog heavily 1 hour before or 1-2 hours after eating. Avoid single large meals. Instead, feed 2-3 small meals a day. Don’t let your dog drink large quantities of water at one time. Often police and military dogs have their stomach tacked to prevent bloat.
         Tips and Tricks: Don’t tell your dog no over and over- correct him then tell him what TO DO. Exercise your dog often for a well behaved animal. The GSD is a family working dog that needs a job.  Let him  be in the house as part of the family.  Go places with your GSD. GSD’s do not need a shock collar to learn.  They are eager to please and learn easily. When you are at the park, after some initial exercise, do some training.  Always praise your GSD when they do the correct thing. Take your GSD as a puppy or adult to group training classes to learn the basics and how to act around other dogs. Take your dog to pet friendly stores and teach them how to act. Carry waste disposal bags and always clean up after your dog. Do not leave a choke chain or pinch training collar on after training
Antifreeze Poisoning  is one of the most common forms of poisoning in small animals, and this is because it is so commonly found in households. Antifreeze poisoning typically happens when antifreeze drips from a car’s radiator, where it is licked off the ground and ingested by a pet. It is the toxin ethylene glycol that makes antifreeze lethal.
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© 2016 Tulsa German Shepherds
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TulsaGermanShepherds.com
Health & Information
Food & Substances that can be harmful to dogs. Chocolate Coffee & Tea Caffeine Grapes & Raisins Currents Macadamia Nuts Milk & Dairy Products Mushrooms Onion & Garlic Raw Eggs Raw Meat Salt Yeast Dough Xylitol (Artificial Sweeter)
Bloat in GSD can cause painful death (Also known as gastric dilatation - volvulus GDV) Bloat is twisting of the stomach. (gastric torsion) Bloat requires immediate veterinary care. Bloat in the German Shepherd is a true emergency condition. Most often surgery is the only way to handle the condition once it happens. Don’t exercise your dog heavily 1 hour before or 1-2 hours after eating. Avoid single large meals. Instead, feed 2-3 small meals a day. Don’t let your dog drink large quantities of water at one time. Often police and military dogs have their stomach tacked to prevent bloat.
         Tips and Tricks: Don’t tell your dog no over and over- correct him then tell him what TO DO. Exercise your dog often for a well behaved animal. The GSD is a family working dog that needs a job.  Let him be in the house as part of the family.  Go places with your GSD. GSD’s do not need a shock collar to learn.  They are eager to please and learn easily. When you are at the park, after some initial exercise, do some training.  Always praise your GSD when they do the correct thing. Take your GSD as a puppy or adult to group training classes to learn the basics and how to act around other dogs. Take your dog to pet friendly stores and teach them how to act. Carry waste disposal bags and always clean up after your dog. Do not leave a choke chain or pinch training collar on after training. 
Antifreeze Poisoning  is one of the most common forms of poisoning in small animals, and this is because it is so commonly found in households. Antifreeze poisoning typically happens when antifreeze drips from a car’s radiator, where it is licked off the ground and ingested by a pet. It is the toxin ethylene glycol that makes antifreeze lethal.